DVD review: “The Bill: Series 7” (1991)

The Bill: Series 7″ (1991)

Television

One hundred and five Episodes

Created by: Geoff McQueen

Featuring: Mark Wingett, Nula Conwell, Mark Haddigan, Peter Ellis, Ben Roberts, Larry Dann, Roger Leach, Seeta Indrani, Mark Powley, Andrew Paul, Huw Higginson, Chris Humphreys, Jeff Stewart and Graham Cole

Detective Sergeant Ted Roach:Knee deep in villains. Even the Cat’s had form.

Re-released recently in repackaged cases is the long running (now defunct) police show “The Bill” (1983-2010), the longest running police show in UK television history, as well as one of the longest running dramas ever. This fourth set is titled “The Bill: Series 7” (1991), which includes all one hundred and five episodes, a mammoth total which would be the norm for a number of years with each episode running approximately thirty minutes including commercials.

When “The Bill” premiered it showed something that had rarely been seen on television, a working police station set in the fictional Sunhill with the narrative set from the point of view of its police officers with no part of the seperate plots told from the criminals, no home life seen (at least in the early years) and only rare conversations about any real home life. Not only were those elements in play but in the early series there were scenes of violence, open racism, alcoholism, swearing and other aspects that attempted to reflect what it was like, not only in early 1980s London but also within the police force itself. When viewing some of the episodes within the first four series it can feel like a show that is firmly set in the 1980s, with most of the officers being white (definitely no minorities in CID), and most of the supposed criminals either being newly arrived foreigners, minorities, young people or lower working class, which is a fairly sad state of affairs. The other element that actually makes the series look very good is the hand held style, the seemingly natural shots, at times if you stumbled across an early episode you might think it was a reality show, which adds to the tension and perceived realism. Finally the casting of either new actors, character actors or very little known actors meant that they all seemed like they were making it up as they went along which again added to its authenticity. Finally in terms of keeping it as real as possible there was a divide between the CID (the plain clothes detectives) and the uniform police which again created tension, and it was difficult for the beat police officers to cross the divide to CID, but when it happened it was obvious how it would go, in the beginning, at least.

This seventh series sees the show with each episode at the shorter running time of thirty minutes (airing three times a week) and the number of episodes increased to around one hundred and two per series, which is a huge increase to workload and regularity, it also meant that viewers were seeing the actors on-screen a lot, this is also meant that the characters who were considered part of the main cast became incredibly famous, they were not unknown for almost a decade, or until they were dropped from the show, which happened with increasing regularity.

Whilst watching this series one of the aspects of the show that becomes apparent is the large cast, with the main actors being, Mark Wingett, Trudie Goodwin, Jon Iles, Jeff Stewart, Graham Cole, Robert Hudson, Nula Conwell, Tony Scannell and Peter Ellis. In fact many of these actors would stay for years, with Trudie Goodwin, Graham Cole, Eric Richards and Mark Wingett staying with the series for three decades.

What becomes apparent upon viewing this series was that there was always a huge turnover, with each series bringing new and different ways to get rid of characters, there were illicit affairs, crooked cops, promotions and demotions. The new arrivals this series were not as large as previous seasons with only two new main characters being introduced they were Sgt Matthew Boyden portrayed by Tony O’Callaghan and WPC Donna Harris portrayed by Louise Harrison. Along with so few arrivals there were only two main departures they being Sgt Joseph Corrie portrayed by Roland Oliver and tragically PC Phil Young portrayed by Colin Alldridge who was given a story arc for his departure which was not handled well but as good as could be expected for the show at this stage of its evolution.

What these comings and going prove is that “The Bill”, like Dick Wolf’s “Law and Order” franchise, would have an ongoing demand for actors that it was not uncommon for guest stars to go on and become huge stars, some examples in this series were appearances Nicholas Courtney, Louise Jameson, Chesney Hawkes, Marc Warren, Alex Kingston, Martine McCutcheon and Ray Winstone of and a host of others which are always great to see and spot.

There are some very real and original episodes among this huge season, for me they are: Machines: Ted Roach isn’t too convinced when a serial fraudster fails to turn up for a court hearing yet again – due to his apparent need to be at home and connected to a kidney dialysis machine – and vows to plot a way into causing him to break his bail conditions. Meanwhile, Tosh is on the trail of some bent photocopiers from a stolen shipment; Fear or Favour: Brownlow’s attempts to smooth things over on the crime-ridden Jasmine Allen estate – by consulting with community leaders back at the nick – comes unstuck. Later the same day one of them is arrested for assaulting June Ackland – after a drugs bust on the estate goes seriously wrong. Should the political implications of the arrest for Brownlow outweigh justice being done?; Night and Day: Following a night-time burglary at an attractive young woman’s flat, Stringer seems more than keen to offer his own brand of victim support. Meanwhile, French investigates repeated calls from an elderly man who thinks he’s seen suspicious nocturnal goings on via his household telescope; Every Mother’s Son: Sun Hill are trying to help a brave doctor who is being lured to the dangerous Blackfield Estate – then attacked and robbed by drug addicts. When the first operation fails due to the over eagerness of Reg and Dave, Inspector Monroe is less than impressed – but the boys get another chance; Closing the Net: Burnside doesn’t seem too impressed with Lines and Martella’s slightly scientific approach to catching a child-molester who’s been stalking local playgrounds. But will his more ‘traditional’ methods be more effective?; The Public Interest: Ackland is baffled as to why the CPS has decided not to proceed with ABH charges against the man who assaulted her in the fracas at the Jasmine Allen. Her respect for the law is further challenged when a middle-aged man is arrested for having a 15-year-old girlfriend – with the couple apparently happily cohabiting and planning a life together; Just Desserts: A man working at a building site dies after accidentally falling from scaffolding – but DCI Reid suspects that it might not be an accident after all; Cold Turkey: Part 1 & Part 2: A tense siege situation emerges after different lines of investigation lead to a knife-wielding and drug-addicted young man – who has already killed once – holed up in a flat with a child hostage; Without Consent: When a street-prostitute who’s been raped goes to Sun Hill to report the crime, she’s faced with a less-than helpful reception. Ackland, who knows the girl, attempts to make amends, and at least see that she’s given a fair hearing; Saints and Martyrs: Ackland decides to press ahead with a private prosecution against the man who assaulted her earlier in the year on the Jasmine Allen estate, despite being urged to do otherwise. Will Brownlow finally get her to see sense, and to not stir things up at Area – or has he perhaps had a change of heart?; The Best You Can Buy: WPC Ackland’s assault hearing against Everton Warwick finally comes to court – and she’s not expecting an easy ride. Will justice be seen to be done or will there be yet another stitch-up?; The Negotiator: A tense situation for Sun Hill ensues when Hollis and a young shop assistant are taken as hostages by a bank robber. Reg’s negotiating skills are put to the test – but will they be enough to get them out of trouble, or could they make things even worse?; The Juggler and the Fortune Teller: Burnside has worked hard for two months to get a difficult rape case to court. But things go badly wrong when, on the day of the hearing, Martella’a briefcase – containing vital evidence – is stolen from her car. Can the missing case be recovered in time – or will they have to proceed without the evidence against a very tough defence brief, who’s determined to clear her client’s name no matter what.; Your Shout: Cathy Marshall is all set for her promotion board – but problems arise when she fails to notice at the start of the shift that the previous relief have not attended a shout, where an estranged father appears to have abducted his two children. Can he and the children be found safe and sound in time, leaving Cathy with a clear conscience, and free of any blame that may be coming her way?; They Also Serve: The relief are acting as reserve troops for a demonstration. At a meal break, Delia, Norika and June find a distressed probationer in the toilet.; Out of Order: PC Young reaches out to WPC Datta who rejects his advances.; The Square Peg: A drunk man stuck up in a tree causes a public disturbance. Meanwhile, troubled PC Young goes missing on his beat and doesn’t respond to his radio – his colleagues try to find him.; Balls in the Air: Sgt. Boyden arrives for his first day at Sun Hill, and is clearly carrying some baggage from his previous posting.; Breakout: The Sun Hill officers’ hope of a peaceful New Year’s Eve is shattered when a dangerous criminal escapes from custody. DC “Yorkie” Smith returns to Sun Hill.

This is just the fourth box set to be re-released with series eight and nine arriving soon, these are the third full one hundred plus episode series, so they are not only good value for money but they see something very interesting happening, that is a step up in production value with not only set filming, but also on location filming, overarching narratives that run for a number of episodes as well as a police station that looks and feels like something far more permanent than is seen in these first four series. There is a lo-fi feel about these series, there is no central or decentralised call centre, there are no real interrogation rooms and the sets feel a little underdone, but because everyone buys into them there is no issue from a viewers point of view, but it is noticed when viewing seasons beyond this and that must be a reason for the releases the way they have always been done, although this is the first time that series four has been included with one to three.

There is no doubt there is a feeling of the beginning of something, but at this stage within the first four series this is a show in search of something, what that is becomes clear by about series five. However in saying that there are a lot of individual stories that easily illustrate the role of certain functions within the police station as well as the kind of crimes one might expect within the inner city as a beat cop. It is also a show that once bought into is like no other show of its time in its attempt at reality with life on the beat. Once it became very popular it did become more polished with much of the sex, violence and swearing cooling right off, but when you reach over fifteen million people per episode it needs to become palatable for a mass audience. Again there are parts of these series in particular that stand out, for instance there is only one black police officer who is teamed or around the one racist which is a little formulaic, this was dropped early on, with more minorities involved as the series progresses.

I recommend this highly, it is vastly rewarding for those that stay with it which is not hard. I am looking forward to the next few series which arrive soon.

Episodes

Grief: Brownlow gets grief about a tree damaging the roof of his holiday home, and more grief for Garfield’s failure to salute DAC Hicks as a senior officer. Furthermore, more grief is in store for officers on emergency traffic duty – and Dashwood’s none too happy when paperwork for his court case is delayed, and lashes out at a member of Sun Hll’s crime support unit.

The Chase: A service station is robbed – Loxton and Hollis give chase in the Area Car, with dramatic consequences.

The Attack: WPC Marshall is viscously attacked in the street in broad daylight by two young men she was tying to arrest. But can her attackers be found? Meanwhile, most of CID are on an obbo at a tobacco factory where a serious blag is meant to be going down.

Crown v Cooper: Loxton and Garfield are in trouble at court, when their witness statements of a knife-wielding man they arrested in a pub altercation seem to contradict each other. Has Loxton bent the truth in order to secure a conviction, leaving Garfield in the lurch?

The Girl Can’t Help It: Veronique, a 14-year-old girl, has gone missing. Quinnan and Ackland visit her parents to try to find out exactly what’s happened – and Quinnan finds out maybe more than he’d bargained for. Meanwhile, Conway has been away on a course, and clashes with Brownlow when he uses one of his new-found techniques to involve the media in the missing girl’s disappearance.

Machines: Ted Roach isn’t too convinced when a serial fraudster fails to turn up for a court hearing yet again – due to his apparent need to be at home and connected to a kidney dialysis machine – and vows to plot a way into causing him to break his bail conditions. Meanwhile, Tosh is on the trail of some bent photocopiers from a stolen shipment.

Loophole: PC Young is feeling out of sorts, and isn’t best impressed when Loxton and Quinnan play a practical joke on him while on his beat. Meanwhile, Carver investigates some violent burglaries on elderly residents’ homes on a sprawling high-rise estate, and finds things may not be quite as they first appear.

Bottle: Sgt Maitland is on the warpath, and determined to knock the relief into shape. But, could his humourless and over-zealous attitude end up backfiring on him?

Samaritan: A seemingly well-to-do man is arrested after he’s seen appearing to attack and sexually assault a disturbed woman patient who has absconded from St Hugh’s Hospital. He claims he’s completely innocent, and was playing ‘Good Samaritan’ to help the woman – but Burnside isn’t convinced.

Fear or Favour: Brownlow’s attempts to smooth things over on the crime-ridden Jasmine Allen estate – by consulting with community leaders back at the nick – comes unstuck. Later the same day one of them is arrested for assaulting June Ackland – after a drugs bust on the estate goes seriously wrong. Should the political implications of the arrest for Brownlow outweigh justice being done?

Start to Finish: Brownlow has an important interview at the selection board – but circumstances seem to conspire to stop him even getting there. Meanwhile, Tom Penny is back – now working as a security officer at a car parts’ factory – where staff appear to be pilfering. But is it really a matter that warrants serious police investigation?

Night and Day: Following a night-time burglary at an attractive young woman’s flat, Stringer seems more than keen to offer his own brand of victim support. Meanwhile, French investigates repeated calls from an elderly man who thinks he’s seen suspicious nocturnal goings on via his household telescope.

Favours: Following a burglary at a scrapyard, suspicion falls on the security company who were keeping an eye on the place – and who are run by an ex-copper friend of Roach’s, Kemble. Can Roach really conduct an impartial investigation into Kemble’s affairs – or could he be likely to do an old friend a favor?

In Chambers: DS Greig thinks he has all the physical evidence he needs to nail his suspect – but his day in chambers threatens to leave him frustrated. Meanwhile, WPC Ford nicks a supermarket shoplifter who doesn’t seem to fit the usual profile.

Kids Don’t Cry Anymore: Roach isn’t impressed when old enemy Hopwood, who’s now working in security, shows up at Sun Hill – and Burnside teams them both up on Hopwood’s operation. Meanwhile, a child inadvertently leads Cryer and Ackland to drug dealing activity on a local council estate.

Too Many Chiefs: Dave and Cathy find trouble at a children’s home for girls. There’s a suicide… and more.

Every Mother’s Son: Sun Hill are trying to help a brave doctor who is being lured to the dangerous Blackfield Estate – then attacked and robbed by drug addicts. When the first operation fails due to the over eagerness of Reg and Dave, Inspector Monroe is less than impressed – but the boys get another chance.

Furthers: A violent criminal has escaped from prison bent on revenge – and Dashwood is one of his intended targets.

Closing the Net: Burnside doesn’t seem too impressed with Lines and Martella’s slightly scientific approach to catching a child-molester who’s been stalking local playgrounds. But will his more ‘traditional’ methods be more effective?

The Public Interest: Ackland is baffled as to why the CPS has decided not to proceed with ABH charges against the man who assaulted her in the fracas at the Jasmine Allen. Her respect for the law is further challenged when a middle-aged man is arrested for having a 15-year-old girlfriend – with the couple apparently happily cohabiting and planning a life together.

Photo Finish: Datta and Garfield are on an obbo (from a neighbouring flat) on the rear a pub where drug dealing is suspected, and gathering photographic evidence. Could it be that the culprits are closer to home than they expected?

Just Desserts: A man working at a building site dies after accidentally falling from scaffolding – but DCI Reid suspects that it might not be an accident after all.

832 Receiving: WPC French has to face some harsh realities when she answers a call about a disturbance at a flat, and finds a young mother inside in distress. WPC Ackland also nicks a teenage thief whose mother seems to have plenty to say for herself!

The Better Part of Valour: In the aftermath of an audacious ram-raid on a security van on a busy public road – where the robbers made off with an enormous amount of money – CID need to work fast and maybe bend a rule or two to get a result.

Double or Quits: Carver and Roach get slightly more than they bargained for during an obbo on a house. Meanwhile, Martella tries to be a bit too clever in court in her efforts to see an habitual criminal put away.

We Could Be Heroes: Quinnan and Stamp are in trouble when, under pressure at the aftermath of a hit-and-run, they make the snap decision to transport the injured victim to hospital – rather than waiting for the ambulance to arrive.

Cold Turkey: Part 1 & Part 2: A tense siege situation emerges after different lines of investigation lead to a knife-wielding and drug-addicted young man – who has already killed once – holed up in a flat with a child hostage.

Now We’re Motoring: DCI Reid is skeptical that Tosh Lines is really pulling his weight – but when he gets close to busting a luxury-car stealing ring, could it be that she is going to be taken for a ride?

Dead Man’s Boots: Cryer pushes for an old lady to be rehoused, following her continual harassment from youths on a sink-estate. Meanwhile, back at the nick, who will step up to become the new Duty Sergeant?

Caught Napping: The Serious Crime Squad are all over Sun Hill like a rash – investigating the recent murder of a supergrass whilst under supposed police protection. Could Burnside be the one left out hanging to dry?

Hammer to Fall: DCI Reid knocks Sun Hill CID back into shape – and asserts her own authority – as the squad go on the trail of a notorious gang leader. But will Burnside and Roach put their personal disputes aside and fall back into line?

Cry Havoc: A violent criminal resists arrest on a sink-estate, stabbing Sgt Peters in the process and going on the run. Without his radio or any back-up, will a pursuing PC Stringer be able to single-handedly bring the attacker to justice?

Rules of Engagement: Martella’s secret affair becomes Sun Hill knowledge when her ex-con boyfriend is put in the frame for fencing stolen goods. She needs to learn some home truths fast when he then tries to blackmail her, compromising her position within CID.

Delivery on Time: A burglar posing as a delivery man is attacking women in their homes, and needs to be caught. Can Tosh, who’s having a rather stressful day at work, be the one to deliver justice in the nick of time?

Black Monday: A man who’d apparently drowned himself 5 years’ ago, just before he was about to stand trial, is seen by Tosh on a bus in Sun Hill – or is he? And can he really be back from the dead? Lines is drawn into murky waters to discover if he is.

Jobs for the Boys: Two burglaries the same night – one a major theft at a cash and carry, the other a lesser one at a bric-a-brac shop – plus two bodies in custody. Could a rather grumpy Sgt Maitland be putting his foot in it, or not?

Without Consent: When a street-prostitute who’s been raped goes to Sun Hill to report the crime, she’s faced with a less-than helpful reception. Ackland, who knows the girl, attempts to make amends, and at least see that she’s given a fair hearing.

Saints and Martyrs: Ackland decides to press ahead with a private prosecution against the man who assaulted her earlier in the year on the Jasmine Allen estate, despite being urged to do otherwise. Will Brownlow finally get her to see sense, and to not stir things up at Area – or has he perhaps had a change of heart?

Observation: As Sun Hill CID joins forces with the Flying Squad for a night-time obbo, things don’t go quite as planned. DCI Reid isn’t happy either about Burnside keeping her in the dark – will it be a night to remember? 

The Greater Good: When Carver and Lines see a car being driven into a scrapyard, they are surprised to discover it belongs to the respected manager of a local young offenders’ centre – also a personal friend of Conway. But when it’s reported stolen soon after the sighting, a whole web of politics opens up which seems in danger of stalling their enquiries.

The Best You Can Buy: WPC Ackland’s assault hearing against Everton Warwick finally comes to court – and she’s not expecting an easy ride. Will justice be seen to be done or will there be yet another stitch-up?

Addict: Alec Peters is back at Sun Hill on light duties, and looking forward to getting back to the job he loves. Meanwhile, Ackland is alerted to an incident in the park, where two youths appear to be high from glue-sniffing – or could it be something more serious?

Black Mark: Dashwood is in trouble when one of his snouts makes a corruption allegation against him – but whose word will the corruption investigation officers believe?

The Right Thing to Do: Following a tip-off, Tosh and Carver bust members of a gospel/rap group backstage after a pub gig. But are things really how they appear to be?

The Harder They Fall: When Loxton gets caught up in an early hours scuffle following a burglary at a nightclub, some excessive force is used before back-up arrives. With Loxton and one of the suspects hospitalised, things suddenly get even worse for both of them.

Something Personal: Carver and Dashwood find a young woman unconscious in a squat – overdosed on drugs, and at death’s door. This re-opens links to Dashwood’s recent past as he desperately wants to track down the dealers responsible, and not to let them slip through his fingers this time.

Hijack: A lorry driver has had his valuable load stolen at gunpoint by hijackers posing as traffic police. Burnside isn’t entirely convinced by the driver’s story, and sets about digging a bit deeper.

With Intent: When the CPS and an incompetent brief appear to let two violent burglars off the hook at a court hearing, Carver is disillusioned – and not in a good frame of mind back at the nick when he attends a group session on the very CPS procedures which he feels have undermined him.

Initiative: A series of robberies around a sink-estate on Sun Hill’s patch point to the culprit being responsible for a recent murder there too. When a victim comes forward, it seems there might be a good chance of a result – but will they have enough to go on to nick him?

Careless Whispers: Following a couple of simultaneous dawn raids by uniform and CID, it appears that Carver’s normally-reliable snout has fed him some duff information. Meanwhile, a young woman with a baby is nicked for using a stolen credit card – is there any way that these incidents are linked?

Minimum Force: On arriving at the scene of a household burglary, Sun Hill officers find that the householder who called them has attacked the burglar – and that his battered and unconscious body is still on the premises. But is everything quite how it first appears? Not everyone is so sure.

Skeletons: A man from the Asian community is viscously stabbed and left in his car on waste ground – but was the attack racially motivated? Meanwhile, Hollis and Stamp make the grisly discovery of several skeletons in a supposedly empty flat.

Targets: Following a spate of street robberies by youths (and some info from a youth arrested by Stamp), Carver and Lines feel they have a lead on a couple of suspects who have the right MO. They try to persuade Burnside to make the resources available to mount an obbo – but have they picked the right targets?

The Negotiator: A tense situation for Sun Hill ensues when Hollis and a young shop assistant are taken as hostages by a bank robber. Reg’s negotiating skills are put to the test – but will they be enough to get them out of trouble, or could they make things even worse?

Reputations: Carver’s snout has info about a robbery at a jeweller’s, and pushes him in the direction of a petty-criminal who appears to be the perpetrator. But it all seems a bit too easy – could it be a fit-up?

The Juggler and the Fortune Teller: Burnside has worked hard for two months to get a difficult rape case to court. But things go badly wrong when, on the day of the hearing, Martella’a briefcase – containing vital evidence – is stolen from her car. Can the missing case be recovered in time – or will they have to proceed without the evidence against a very tough defence brief, who’s determined to clear her client’s name no matter what.

Joey: June Ackland is helping out at a local comprehensive school as a liaison officer – overseeing a music and movement class, and getting the children to talk about their views on robbery and theft. Meanwhile, Loxton arrests a young boy who has committed a street robbery, but seems scared and reluctant to talk.

Your Shout: Cathy Marshall is all set for her promotion board – but problems arise when she fails to notice at the start of the shift that the previous relief have not attended a shout, where an estranged father appears to have abducted his two children. Can he and the children be found safe and sound in time, leaving Cathy with a clear conscience, and free of any blame that may be coming her way?

Ladykiller: Martella drives to a car fire to find a lady was trapped in the car.

A Corporal of Horse: Marshall is acting sergeant with C relief. She watches one of the relief drive away in an unmarked police car without wearing his tunic after PC Smollett points it out. She tries to sort out a problem without backup.

Cause and Effect: Sun Hill officers attend a break-in at an animal-testing research centre, and make an arrest. It appears at first that only some paperwork has been stolen, until a member of the centre’s staff is found bludgeoned on the floor. The prisoner being held in custody after the fracas seems determined to outwit Burnside – and events soon take on an even more surprising and sinister turn.

Getting Involved: A man’s car is being continually vandalised, and Smollett is reminded of a fatal hit-and-run case he was involved in investigating. Could it now be a case of the victim’s family wanting revenge? Meanwhile, Carver and Greig investigate the aftermath of a viscous assault in a pub.

Benefit of the Doubt: Ted Roach investigates the aftermath of a prostitute who was assaulted and thrown out of a moving car. His enquiries lead him not only to a barrister, but also a judge.

Crack-Up: Sun Hill is involved in an incident at a pawn shop.

The Last Laugh: Three cars race to the scene of an armed robbery – only to discover it’s a hoax call, and for Quinnan to land an assault complaint. Could it be that a suspiciously-parked excavator will come to Quinnan’s rescue?

Access: CID investigate a burglary of an OAP, who has an asthma attack. Stamp talks to a lady who turned away a man supposedly from the Gas Board.

Six of One: PC Stringer chases a girl on foot who has stolen goods from a jewellers but PC Stamp arrests her because he is in a car.

Married to the Job: Stamp arrives at his shift in a foul mood – and seems to be taking it out on colleagues and the public alike. Meanwhile, Brownlow is on edge as he awaits the arrival of some important guests at the nick for a crime support meeting.

Domestic: Burnside is not exactly sympathetic when a victim of domestic violence withdraws her complaint. Meanwhile, DS Meadows is conducting an inspection of the station.

Stress Rules: Brownlow comes back from a conference and wants to start an anti-stress programme. A boy is stabbed and Young and Marshall investigate.

They Also Serve: The relief are acting as reserve troops for a demonstration. At a meal break, Delia, Norika and June find a distressed probationer in the toilet.

Inside Job: A shop assistant is attacked and robbed of the week’s takings by thieves on a motorcycle.

Bones of Contention: Sgt Cryer investigates when anonymous letters expose PC Stringer’s affair, in police time, with a prisoner’s wife, while Datta and Stamp lie in wait for a blackmailer. Meanwhile, Conway is frustrated at a lack of promotion.

Wide of the Mark: When a small-time crook is brought in with some stolen video recorders, he comes out with some unlikely-sounding information.

Hitting the Mark: Meadows leads the investigation into the murder of Greig’s informant.

Bending the Rules: A yob arrested for shoplifting turns out to be a respectable police officer. DI Burnside unravels the story of the change of behaviour.

Skint: Garfield hosts a birthday party he can’t really afford, while Quinnan winds up Carver once too often.

Friday and Counting: Hollis, a missing handbag and a recluse police pensioner, all help to unravel a murder investigation.

Lest We Forget: Ch.Supt Brownlow is questioned by Yorkshire Police about his involvement in a murder enquiry seventeen years before that led to a wrongful conviction.

Nutters: Meadows and Burnside investigate the murder of a young man – nicknamed ‘Hedgehog’ – outside a nightclub.

Downtime: A suspected violent break-in begins to suggest more clues about the house occupants than anything else – especially as they are missing.

Out of Order: PC Young reaches out to WPC Datta who rejects his advances.

Empire Building: A major operation takes place to catch people with unpaid fines.

Innocence: Two boys are reported missing by their parents after they’re sent to the shops and don’t return.

Losing It: PC Young discovers a suicide, and is deeply affected. Later, he visits Datta in the section house and attacks her.

Shots: Cryer and Conway attend a seminar at the Metropolitan Police Training Camp concerning Armed Response Vehicles. Running into Loxton there, Cryer isn’t convinced he has changed for the better.

The Square Peg: A drunk man stuck up in a tree causes a public disturbance. Meanwhile, troubled PC Young goes missing on his beat and doesn’t respond to his radio – his colleagues try to find him.

A Question of Confidence: After a series of assaults on local prostitutes, Burnside and Martella make enquiries. Evidence starts to point to an escaped criminal who is at large, Hawkins – but not many people seem willing to help.

Balls in the Air: Sgt. Boyden arrives for his first day at Sun Hill, and is clearly carrying some baggage from his previous posting.

The Taste: PC Smollett and Sgt Cryer each rediscover that there is more to policing than just their desk-bound assignments.

Turning Back the Clock: DI Burnside is determined to clear up a three year old case of robbery and murder when an old acquaintance is released from prison. DCs Carver and Lines begin to have doubts when they learn their tailings operation is “unofficial”.

Discretion: PC Smollett, as the new Home Beat Officer, introduces himself to the community. A boy is found unconscious with gaming machine tokens in his pocket – which are later used to help identify him.

Chapter and Verse: A girl goes missing after she leaves the pub.

The Whole Truth: Datta appears in court and gets a hard time from the defence brief. Stringer is assaulted in a car park.

Profit and Loss: A Turkish woman is found dead by two bailiffs who broke into her flat and found water running down the stairs.

Thicker Than Water: Loxton and Stringer attend a domestic where the husband is one of their own.

On the Take: A stake-out fails to catch the crooks, and speculation starts about an inside informer.

Caring: June talks to a woman at the hospital who appears to be being battered, but is instead dealing with a schizophrenic son. Stamp and Quinnan are caught giving an unauthorized lift.

The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Carver regrets doing Roach a favour by interviewing a suspect – who later turns out to be underage. Meanwhile, Burnside arrests a career criminal with a dodgy car, and Reid is sweet-talked from on-high.

Imposters: Marshall and Stamp try to find a missing homeless person. Meanwhile, Ackland and Garfield attend a punch-up at a pub and uncover a stash of police uniforms, and there’s also a hunt on for hardcore pornography.

A Woman Scorned: A dog finds a buried body. Reid considers her staffing options.

Vital Statistics: The pressure is on from on-high to increase the number of arrests. Meanwhile, a baby goes missing with her babysitter – and Reg is busy organizing a disco.

Decent People: PC Quinnan works undercover on a building site to investigate the theft of kitchen units, but finds himself in a compromising situation.

Breakout: The Sun Hill officers’ hope of a peaceful New Year’s Eve is shattered when a dangerous criminal escapes from custody. DC “Yorkie” Smith returns to Sun Hill.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s